Posted in Book Reviews

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

Five Stars

A Gentleman in Moscow is an exquisite story written in the spirit of Russian literature with a contemporary voice. Spanning from 1922 to 1954, this book tells about a Russian count under house arrest in a hotel in Moscow.  With historical accuracy and unforgettable characters, this is a title to move to the beginning of your “to-read” list.

Posted in Current Projects, Poetry, Publication Updates

Give Me an “M”

I am still looking for title words to add to one of my current projects. I cannot guarantee your word will be chosen for the theme of a poem, but if it is, I will give proper acknowledgement when the book is published.

Here are the current title words for the letter “M.”

Magnetic

Meager

Mellifluous

Memoriter

Memorize

Mensch

Mercy

Mighty

Mild

Miraculous

Mnemonic

Moggy

Mosaic

Mumpsimus

Mushroom

Mystery

Posted in Between the Lines: This Writer's Journal, Uncategorized

Write Anytime?

Most of the time, I can write anywhere. I can tune out the background noise or I plug in my ear buds. But, write anytime? Somehow that’s harder.

I have times of the day when my mind flickers like a burning-out lightbulb. I feel it start about 3:30pm. Sometimes I get a surge at 7:00pm and then I can keep going until 8:30 or so. By 9:00pm, I’m out! That’s true for more than writing. I’ve found myself go into shut-down mode as soon as that hour begins.

I find that my best writing hours are from 9am to 11am and from 1:00 to 3:00pm. Even so, a solid two-hour stint doesn’t always happen. I need to refuel or pay attention to the dogs and cat or answer a question from one of the kids or stop before the next activity begins. (When I started writing this post, it was just before my Bible study. I had to stash my phone away mid-sentence so that I could greet one of my friends.)

But, here is the point. Write. Set that two-hour block aside (and maybe a second two-hour block), but write. Take five minutes to sketch out a blog post. Type or write the one word that begins the poem or summarizes a story. Stop everything and write something. Even if later, you wonder what you meant by that. Then write what it means to you right this minute.

Just write. Anytime!